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    Yubari, Japan's Most Rapidly Declining City In Daily Mail | Lost Collective

    • 2 min read

    Daily Mail Logo - yubari - family school fureai

    This gallery was the product of four days wandering the streets of Yubari, taking snippets of occupied and abandoned buildings from those and joining them into this gallery.

    Before this trip, I always envisioned Japan as a sprawling tech hub where everything is illuminated and busy. It can even become an assault on the senses. I've been four times now. I won't be surprised if we go four more. We love Japan. It's an amazing culture to immerse yourself in.

    streetscapes-of-yubari_2016_april_22

    So, as we travelled further from the city centres to the regional towns and rural areas found withing an hour or two of the city centres, I saw a very different Japan to what I'd seen before.

    In smaller villages and hamlets, instead of continuations of the small family businesses, the younger generation abandon the store or farm in seek of better work opportunities found in more populated places.

    The communities begin to fade away and the buildings that they lived and work from become abandoned.

    Our excellent tour guide for a day in Yubari was Sato San.

    shimizusawa-power-plant_2016_april_84

    Sato San is part of a group of volunteers, historians, aficionados and advocates called the Shimizusawa Project , who work to preserve the history of Yubari and its importance in the story of the Japans industrialisation.

    shimizusawa-power-plant_2016_april_85

    "Yuburi, which founded in 1943 on the northernmost island of Japan, Hokkaido, was built to exploit vast coal reserves in the region and once had a thriving population of 120,000.

    Now, after a series of mining disasters, changes to the mining industry and an ageing population, the number of residents in the city has fallen to just 9,000.

    Stunning images of the seemingly deserted city captured by Australian photographer Brett Patman reveal the run-down and neglected buildings that have been left to decay."

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    To read the full article, click here .

    Daily Mail is a handpicked selection of the latest news, sport, showbiz, science and health stories from around the world.