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    MV Cape Don Feature In News Local | Lost Collective

    • 2 min read

    News Local Logo - mungo Scott Flour Mill - MV Cape Don

    Early in 2016, I was invited by my friend Daniel to come and photograph the MV Cape Don at the Balls Head Coal Loader. How could I resist?

    When we arrived at the coal loader, the skies had just opened up to the point I couldn't even get out of the car. It was bucketing down, lightning and all!

    So we waited for it to pass and finally got to board the ship for the shoot. We also got to see the old wharf which is on its last legs.

    Wharf

    We spent roughly two hours shooting the ship while Daniel taught us about the history. It was interesting to see having never been inside anything like this before. The engine room was something.

    Main Engine

    When it was time to go. The only the problem is that I'd lost my keys, or so I thought.

    I started panicking, madly rummaging through my camera bag in the hope of finding them but no luck.

    Propellor Shaft

    We retraced our steps throughout the MV Cape Don in the hope my keys would turn up, hopefully, left in a visible spot but we had no luck.

    After getting a lift all the way home to pick up a spare set of keys and then coming back at midnight, it turns out that they were in my camera bag all along. They had fallen to one of the bottom compartments.

    You live you learn.

    Engine Order Telegraph

    For more than a decade a loyal band of volunteers have been scrambling over the decks of the MV Cape Don to make it shipshape once again.

    MV Cape Don Society ship keeper Daniel Callender said the retired navigational aids ship, docked at Balls Head Bay, was a treasure that deserved to be saved.

    “This ship went around to all the bad and dangerous waters in Australia to ­deliver lighthouse supplies and help keep sailors safe,”

    To see the original article in News Local, click here.

    Galley

    News Local . The latest Sydney news and local community newspaper including local NSW news, local Sydney and council news.